Vegan Gochujang Mayo

29th March 2015

Gochujang is a pantry staple in my home. This Korean fermented red pepper paste is big on flavor and easy to incorporate into a number of different recipes, and not just the Asian ones. So when I recently started experimenting with making my own homemade mayo from scratch, I was immediately inspired to create a Vegan Gochujang Mayo.

Vegan Gochujang Mayo

For a more mild flavor and a creamier colored mayo like the one used in the rice bowl above, use less than the suggested amount of gochujang in the recipe.

With just a few simple ingredients and a high speed blender, I said hello to homemade and goodbye to store bought vegan mayos. What’s more, you can take this base and substitute a number of different alternatives for gochujang – like miso, dill, cilantro or chipotle just to name a few. Play around and find the flavors you want to incorporate and you’ll realize that you no longer need to buy your vegan mayo at the store.

Vegan Gochujang Mayo Rice Bowl

There aren’t too many ingredients needed to make this Gochujang Mayo, but one of the primary ingredients needed is soya or nut milk. I highly recommend that whichever one you choose to use, you find one with a mild flavor and as few ingredients as possible. It’s unfortunate to see the number of additives and ingredients often found in soya milks sold in stores across the United States. That’s why I love Westsoy Organic Unsweetened Soy Milk. It has just two ingredients – filtered water and organic whole soybeans. The flavor is mild and free from any artificial or off tastes that I often find in these over-processed soy milks today.

Once you have all the ingredients, this recipe is incredibly simple. Just add all of the ingredients except the sunflower oil to a high speed blender and briefly blend on high. This may take up to a minute or longer if you do not have a high speed blender. Once the ingredients are incorporated you drizzle the oil into the blender while running it at a low speed so the oil emulsifies and you’ll quickly have a creamy Vegan Gochujang Mayo. Adding the oil slowly while the blender is on a low speed is essential to getting the emulsion. I used the Vitamix S30 personal blender to make this mayo; due to the smaller container size, this model is perfect for making sauces like this.

Vegan Gochujang Mayo Burger

You may opt to vary the amount of gochujang used in the recipe depending on your tastes and preferences. For a richer burnt orange color follow the recipe. I’m wearing LVX Spring 2015 Voyage.

The robust flavors of Gochujang have made it one of my favorite ingredients for a few years now, but with the increased popularity of Korean cuisine we are starting to see a broader use of this fermented red pepper paste in the United States. The flavors are a bit like a mildly spicy miso with a subtle sweetness and a lovely umami component.

Adding gochujang, rice vinegar and ground Thai chilies gives this mayo a distinctly Asian flavor and the rich red color of the gochujang makes the mayo an enticing burnt orange color. You can add this versatile Gochujang Mayo to burgers, tacos, wraps, rice bowls or any of your favorite dishes requiring a mildly spicy creamy sauce.

Vegan Gochujang Mayo Rice Bowl

I love the way this Gochujang Mayo elevates a simple bowl of grains and vegetables into a complete meal, like my brown and red rice bowl below with roasted purple sweet potato (Friedas Inc), tangy kale, roasted corn and black beans.

Cooked Black Beans

Stokes Purple Sweet Potato

Note: You may opt to vary the amount of gochujang used in the recipe depending on your tastes and preferences. For a richer burnt orange color follow the recipe. For a more mild flavor and a creamier colored mayo like the one used in the rice bowl, use less than the suggested amount of gochujang in the recipe.

Vegan Gochujang Mayo

Vegan Gochujang Mayo

Yield: about 1 cup

Ingredients

  • ½ cup soya milk, unsweetened (preferably West Soy)
  • 1 teaspoon rice vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar
  • ¼ teaspoon yellow mustard (mild one like Annie’s Naturals)
  • ½ teaspoon table salt
  • ¼ cup gochujang or Korean red pepper paste (use less if desired, see Notes)
  • ½ teaspoon ground dried Thai bird’s eye chilies, not red flakes or more if desired
  • ¼ teaspooon maple syrup
  • ¾ cup sunflower or neutral oil

Method

Place all of the ingredients except the oil in a high-speed blender and blend on high until ingredients are fully incorporated. Pause to scrape the sides of the blender and combine any ingredients that did not blend. Then switch to low speed and slowly add the oil until preferred mayo consistency is achieved.

If the mixture isn’t fully combined, turn the blender off and scrape the sides to incorporate all of the ingredients before blending again. If you need to stop and stir the mixture, do not leave it standing too long or your mayo may begin to separate or break.

Transfer your mayo to a glass container with a lid and refrigerate for an hour prior to using, allowing the flavors to meld and the mixture to thicken.

Notes

Advance Preparation: Store the mayo in the fridge for up to 1 week. Make sure you stir prior to using. For the best consistency and flavor, eat them within 2-3 days.

Mayo Version just like ‘Earth Balance’: You can make your homemade mayo without the following ingredients: gochujang and dried Thai bird’s eye chilies. Very simple to make!

Mild Orange or Dark Orange Color: You may opt to vary the amount of gochujang used in the recipe depending on your tastes and preferences. For a richer burnt orange color follow the recipe. For a more mild flavor and a creamier colored mayo like the one used in the rice bowl, use less than the suggested amount of gochujang in the recipe.

High-speed Blender alternative: If you do not have a powerful or high-speed blender, keep blending longer. It will take time but you should still be able to achieve the creamy mayo consistency.

Soya Milk: I haven’t tried the mayo recipe with nut-based milks yet, but I personally like soya milk. I especially like West Soy Organic Unsweetened Soymilk because it has only two ingredients (filtered water and whole organic soybeans), giving it a clean, simple flavor.

For the gochujang, we used the brand Jayone (Product of Korea) and it’s mildly spicy and incredibly versatile for a number of recipes. You can find other gochujang brands at an Asian supermarket. The spiciness will vary between brands, so be sure to taste your gochujang prior to using.

If you are unable to find gochujang, try this quick homemade ‘gochujang’ recipe. I like that she used something fermented, white miso, and overall so few ingredients in her recipe compared to other recipes I’ve looked at. This is probably close to the gochujang products I have had.

Vegan Gochujang Mayo

Vegan Gochujang Mayo Rice Bowl

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